Finite

finite

A lovely quote along the same veins of Jack Dawson’s desire to make each day count. Or those posts encouraging moms/dads to savor every moment, even as they are cleaning poop out of the crevasses of a high chair, because one day you’ll miss this/that.

But it can be a rather tall order sometimes can it? To savor. To linger. To extract as much as possible from every moment. Because there are times when you just don’t what to. When the upcoming moments seem so much better than the current. Yes life is finite but life doesn’t always seem to care that it is.

life

We spend our moments sitting on stationary planes, cleaning hairballs out of the carpet, or working to deal with an ant problem in the kitchen. (As an Ant-Man fan, I’m trying to be as humane as possible.)

We also sometimes wish for time to pass quickly. The bad day. The bad week. The deployment. The treatment program for a health issue. We look forward to the weekend, Christmas, the vacation, or even something as simple as bed time.

There are countless posts/posters/whatevers imploring humans to savor, to seek the exciting, yet there is lack of recognizing that it’s not always feasible or desired. We get tired, over-whelmed, sick, or just need a break.

Every day can’t be legendary, if they were, no day would be. Boring is what makes the exciting, exciting. Bad is what makes the good, good.

So you do you, to the best of your ability. Sleep late if that makes you happy. Don’t buy the shoes if don’t what to. Lay on the floor, alone with your thoughts, if that’s what you need. Hide from your kids if you’re on the verge of losing your mind.

Remember very moment may not be legendary but every moment is important. The good, the bad, the exciting, the boring. Extra sleep could be just what your body needs. Use alone time to recharge your mommy/daddy powers.

Because those exciting/cherished moments need us at our best, rested and recharged, and that’s just what the boring/throw away moments are for.

Until next time,

The Texan

P.S. You are of course invited to ignore everything you just read and do the complete opposite. You do you, you beautiful little human. I will support you and tell you that you are amazing!

Now please enjoy this picture of Loki for no other reason other than, I love him.

loki

 

 

Feedback

Earlier this month, “The Space Between”, a screenplay by yours truly was read and evaluated by industry professional Dave Trottier. And while he didn’t love my script he also didn’t hate it, so my screenwriting career is half full.

sebastian

Much of his criticisms were either issues I had kinda noticed myself or things I completely understood, and as I read his eval ideas immediately came to mind. Currently four pages worth of stronger plot points, better dialogue, and a new twist ending. Oh happy, writing…uh…day.

**ponders for a moment**

Yes that can be a thing. Happy writing day!

Said twist earned Mr. Trottier’s approval, thank goodness because I had my concerns. I mean what kind of writer writes a screenplay about a writer who decides in the end that she really doesn’t want to be a writer. Are we allowed to do that?

Although the screenplay I’m currently working on is a movie in which the growing movie business is the main antagonist…

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In short, be a writer/human who graciously accepts feedback, both positive and negative. Use the wisdom of experienced writers/editors/consultants, for it is the very thing that started me down the path to making “The Space Between” a much better story.

Until next time,

The Texan

 

Advice Hunting

This week I have been working on going over the highlighted sections of screenplay writing books that I read, and also searching the “interwebs” for other sources of sound advice. In Screenplay by Syd Field, he emphasizes knowing the characters, and making sure the lead is active, as in causes things to happen rather than just lets things happen to them. Last night I read an article on a website called http://www.scriptmag.com which had some quality advice of its own for unknown writers; like me:

*comedies should be about 98 pages long….got it

*short narrative, dialogue, and description 4 lines or less….okay

*paint story with words….I have a pallet full of words!

*no “we see”, “we hear”, or “beat”…’kay, but I’ve seen that in screenplays that I’ve read….oh that’s just for “established” writers

*if the scene or piece of dialogue doesn’t move the story forward-get rid of it…right

*get The Screenwriters Bible…oh-kay

*be a secure writer…uh oh, I mean, of course secure writer, I can or might be able to do that….it’s not like I’m an insecure human or anything

*create a script that is fun for you to write, and easy for the reader (aka the “gate keeper”) to read and recommend…..I can do that

I also read an article in which the guy suggested that one should watch their 5 favorite movies while reading through the screenplay. Now this is tricky because finding the final, what the actor had in their hand, draft of a screenplay is quite difficult. It’s either an early draft or some guy/gal who watched the movie a bunch of times and just wrote down the dialogue; not in screenplay format, and not helpful. Plus my 5 favorite movies are…varied, in style, genre, and mood; and they are as follows:

*The Young Victoria

*Captain America: The Winter Solider

*Pride and Prejudice (2005)

*My Fellow Americans

*It Happened One Night (the granddaddy of romantic comedies, winner of 5 academy awards, it is movie perfection)

As my husband said, “Those are…different.” Yeah. Although last night I did watch Leap Year (I know its not awesome, but its not bad either) while reading through a revised draft of the screenplay, which was little different from what appeared on screen, but it did give me an idea of how a scene looks on paper. At this point it helps enormously that I have characters, a story line, and an ending for both “Cambridge” and “Brooklyn”, I just need to put them in the right format. So today I thought I would practice proper screenplay format using one of the scenes from “Cambridge”. Back in May, I think it was, I introduced Mae Forester, history major, from Kansas, and is attending Cambridge University over the summer. She meets Evan O’Brady, English guy, who leads tour groups around Cambridge over the summer. They first meet right after she gets off the bus, this scene is a couple of day later.

***********************************************

EXT. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY-MORNING

Mae going for a jog, she stops to stretch a lot, dancing a little bit to the music that is coming through her head phones. Evan is with his friend Jeff, further up the street.

EVAN
(sees Mae jogging)
Jeff, there she is.

JEFF
There who is?

EVAN
You know the girl from 2 days ago. Remember I told she was dragging her suitcase.

JEFF
That’s “Jayhawks”?

Mae starts running their way, in the zone.

EVAN
Come on mate, she was cute. She was just tir-

Mae runs into him.

MAE
Oh…I’m so sorry.

EVAN
No no really Miss it was my fault.

Jeff rolls his eyes.

MAE
I guess I was in the “zone”. Music helps me when I run because, I don’t really like running. Just trying to get over some jet-lag. (smiles at Evan) I feel like I’ve seen you before… (realizes) You’re the guy…the one who helped me with my suitcase.

EVAN
Yes, yes that was me.

MAE
I’m sorry if I seemed rude or anything. I just don’t travel very well. Those couple days were just a blur.

EVAN
No its okay. You seem to be doing better.

MAE
Getting adjusted. I’m Mae by the way, Mae Forester.

Mae puts out her hand for a handshake.

EVAN
Evan O’Brady.

They share a really long handshake, Jeff’s eyes widen.

JEFF
Um, Evan..

EVAN
Right. So what brings you to Cambridge?

Jeff rolls his eyes again.

MAE
I got accepted into a 3 month program here at the university.

JEFF
That’s nice. Lovely to meet you Mae, but we must be going.

MAE
(looks at watch)
I have to get ready for class. I guess I’ll see y’all around.

EVAN
We’ll be around.

MAE
Bye.

EVAN
Bye.

Evan smiles as he watches Mae jog away, until Jeff comes into his line of vision.

EVAN
What?

JEFF
She just said she’s leaving in 3 months, get that look off your face.

*********************************************************

Okay the margins are trickier than I was expecting, I might need a screenplay formatting program…type thing. But still not too bad for my first time. By the way, today I got to physically do this…

sebastian2

…with my Bachelor of Arts degree, AND they sent me a cool alumni decal to put on my car! I know, awesome!

Until next time,

The Texan

Whoa that post went a little long, please accept this bit of humor as my way of saying…sorry the post was so long.